92 Comments

This was great. Thx Chuck

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Did you ask Max Brooks the question about the book and his mother after having wrote ‘Damned’?

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Thanks for this, I talked with someone at great length at the book signing yesterday, just about this.

Also, damn. You just spent a whole day socializing, then share this the next day. You have so much strength.

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Hit me when and where I needed to be hit.

And hard.

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Im pretty confident that I can see whats really being sorted out in your work. But Im sure I get some of it wrong. Lullaby is an obvious one.

Have you heard or read what Alan Moore has to say about Magick? How what we think of as magick is actually just language, and how it affects us? Spelling/casting a spell. Grammar/grimoire. When wielded skillfully, language can coax a person of out self absorption, or out of living in the future (anxiety), or living in the past (depression). Our brains are so much more powerful than we can comprehend. Especially in terms of our connections to one another. I believe that Alan is correct. And my quality of life has been greatly enhanced by this sort of grounded magical thinking.

Also, this was a great read. Appreciate you. I thought Rosemarys Baby had to do with Roe v Wade?

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Thank you so much for this.

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The shitting out a lump of coal metaphor will stick with me for a long time. Thank you good sir

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Chuck, I love how you seamlessly threaded so many stories together. Some writers bury the story behind the story deeper than others. Others, Hubert Selby comes to mind, attack their demons head on.

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Does anybody have any useful tricks on sussing out ideas for fiction metaphors?

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Beautiful post, Chuck. I especially like, "I’ve not revealed any of the real dangerous personal issues in my own writing. I’m not going to." After reading this, I looked (and confirmed) that the bit about Ms. Bancroft did what all revelations do: it showed up on a Wikipedia page. It's now a bit of trivia. I like that I can live with a book like Fight Club for over twenty years and have my theories, responses, emotions, and frustrations with the book—and never really have the "Oh, I happen to know that the secret code—Chuck's secret code—is xxxxxxx." In all the Dangerous Writing books you listed, the power is in the book. It's there, whether or not we can spot it. It's subtle. And the hidden source (that the book jacket doesn't say, "An allegory about dangerous chemicals") keeps novels from becoming bits of ideology or relying on their "message" so much that the actual story is irrelevant. Good stuff.

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founding

I heard Max Brooks mention that he had dyslexia so his mom quit acting to help her son. Maybe that’s also in World War Z , how people stay home or in small groups to do what they have to do, survive.

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Can I print this and hand out copies at our story night? I enjoy good stories, I enjoy stories I don't like because I appreciate the process. I love metaphor rooted from experience.

Memoir?

A story by Eric Iversen.

"I'm sad."

The end.

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Learning that Anne would eat her dog if she had to makes her more attractive. I like a gal who can survive a harsh winter.

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The Daily Telegraph? Wow.

I'm honestly very surprised they'd commission that- they're a very conservative paper here, aimed at an older readership, who have gone increasingly down the line of articles with 'anti woke' and 'climate change is a fiction' as an agenda as they chase readers.

I'm fascinated that they would think there was a crossover between their readers and yours.

Thanks for posting on on here!

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This is exactly what I needed to read right now. Thank you for this. I can’t tell you how much this impacts me, but one day, maybe, I can show it with my writing.

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Was thinking about something you said a while ago. About your star sign, Pisces, being the only water sign without a shell. And how you need to have that ongoing story in your head to focus on. How issues in life don't seem as daunting in comparison. I asked you what happens when you don't have that shell and I think you said you were miserable. You started beef with friends, took Ambien, drank.

And I realized that's pretty much how I live. Without that shell. Which is strange because I'm a Scorpio. And I think it's all because I'm not writing about things that are dangerous. Or maybe not dangerous enough.

Do you have any tips on how to find dangerous topics in my life? Because all I can come up with is death or perhaps physical or emotional trauma.

Thanks Chuck, great piece.

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